4 Ways Gold is Used for Medicinal Purposes

Unbeknownst to many of us, gold has many uses in medicine, and some might surprise even the most knowledgeable people. Gold has been part of medicine for millenia, going back 5,000 years when it was first used to revitalize the body by the Egyptians. In those times, people thought gold had special powers. In medieval times, it found use as a cure for arthritis. Today, we use gold in different ways from detecting to curing the most deadly diseases.

Gold Radiates a Cure for Cancer

Medicinal Gold

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Gold treats some types of cancer like ovarian and prostate cancer. Doctors inject radioactive gold particles into areas with cancerous growths and the radiation helps fight the cancer over time. Gold has many qualities which make it suitable for this treatment. Since gold is very inert, it is safe to inject it into the body and it will not degrade.

Other properties make gold an exceptional choice. Studies found gold cancer treatments extend life and reduce pain and physical wasting often associated with cancer. Gold is usually a last resort, and used only to treat inoperable cancers using current surgical techniques. Gold lasers will kill cancers without causing damage to neighboring cell tissue.

The Gold Diagnosis: Positive

Gold Diagnostics

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Gold is also used to diagnose a range of diseases and viruses. It is prepared in a solution called Colloidal Gold and radiated. Doctors then inject it into the body. The radioactive gold emits beta particles as it moves through the subject. By tracking the emissions, doctors can diagnose conditions such as syphilis and influenza.

A Magic Pill Made of Gold

Golden Pill

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Starting in the early 1900’s, Colloidal Gold treated alcoholism. In modern times it can stop addiction to cigarettes, alcohol and even caffeine. But there are many more uses that make it a true golden solution. As far back as the late 1800’s and right up until today, gold is used to relieve arthritis pain in joints and muscles. It also helps by increasing blood circulation and can solve heart problems.

Gold has a balancing effect in the body that Europeans have long relied on. They often take gold in pill form and have been doing so for over a century. Gold helps to re-balance certain parts of the body like the digestive track and even the brain. It can also help reduce hot flashes or chills by regulating the body’s core temperature.

Gold Takes a Surgical Approach in Medicine

Surgical Gold

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Gold is also used during surgery to seal blood vessels, nerve endings and arteries. Since it is so malleable and stable, it makes the perfect metal for a quick suture. Doctors also use it to mend bones. Many surgeon’s tools are made of gold like forceps, surgical knives and other tools used during surgery everyday.

As you can see, gold has several uses in the medical field. From curing cancers to rejuvenating bodily functions, it is an extraordinary metal.

Nine Fascinating Facts About Gold

As useful as it is beautiful, gold is the king of the elements. Here are some fascinating facts about the world’s most popular metal.

1. Three Quarters of the World’s Gold May Have Already Been Mined

Gold Mine

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Human beings have extracted about 166,000 metric tons of gold from the ground during our entire history. As of 2011, the US Geological Survey has estimated there are about 51,000 unmined metric tons of gold worldwide.

2. The First Coins Were Made of Gold

Gold Coins

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The Lydians made the first coins in the fifth century BC. They lived in an area that is now part of Turkey. The metal in the coins was a natural mixture of gold and silver called electrum.

The practice of using coinage instead of bartering must have had its advantages. Not long after this invention, the Persians conquered the Lydians, and they started using coins, too.

3. Trillions of Dollars Worth of Gold Are Dissolved in the Ocean

Ocean Gold

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Seawater contains an average of 13 parts per trillion of gold. Altogether, it amounts to about 25 billion ounces of gold. However, the cost of removing the gold from the water would still be more than it’s worth.

4. Gold May Have Formed in a Huge Freak Explosion in Deep Space

Gold in Space

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Most of the Earth’s elements were created by stars that were going through the supernova phases of their lives, acting as furnaces for atomic fusion. Many scientists say that gold could not have formed in this way. However, some astrophysicists believe that gold formed when two neutron stars collided, during one of the most violent occurrences that ever takes place in our universe.

5. Gold Has Been Found on Every Continent

Gold on Every Continent

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Although gold is a relatively rare substance—it’s 75th in commonness out of 90 naturally occurring elements on earth—it is distributed everywhere. Some places are richer in deposits than others, such as Australia, South Africa, and Nevada in the United States.

6. Twenty Percent of Gold Used for Decorative Purposes Is Contained in Indian Saris

Indian Gold

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Gold is so malleable that it forms not only the finest gauges of wire, but fine, flexible thread that people can sew. In India, this thread is used to embroider fabric for making flowing wrap garments called saris.

7. Glass Treated With Gold Repels Infrared Rays

Repel Infrared Rays

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The infrared, or heat-inducing, waves from the sun reflect off the crystalline structure of gold atoms. Glass treated with gold shielded the eyes of the Apollo astronauts outside the earth’s protective atmosphere. Today, gold-treated glass helps to control the temperature inside glass-walled buildings.

8. Injections of Gold Once Fought Arthritis

Gold Injection

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Gold is not only nontoxic, but also has anti-inflammatory properties. In the early twentieth century, doctors administered gold injections to people suffering from rheumatoid arthritis. Less expensive and even more effective therapies have now replaced the gold shots. It’s still a medical mystery how they worked.

9. Discovering Gold Is No Longer an Accident

Discover Gold

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People used to find gold by chance. When General John Sutter was building a sawmill in Coloma, California in 1848, an employee of his discovered lumps of gold at the construction site. This was the beginning of the Gold Rush of 1849.

Today, geologists know that they are more likely to find gold near fault lines where water has circulated. It is most likely to be discovered along with certain other minerals including quartz, silver, calcite, and ironically, pyrite, which is sometimes mistaken for gold.

Gold is not only an attractive metal, but an intriguing one, too.

6 Facts You Didn’t Know About James Bond’s Goldfinger

The James Bond franchise of movies is one of the most popular franchises of all time. The 1964 release “Goldfinger” stands as one of the installments that Bond fans come back to again and again. This iconic movie has been combed over by movie fans for decades, but there are still plenty of things that the average movie-goer does not know about this very famous movie.

The Gold Looked Real

Real Gold

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In the movie, there is a scene that is filmed in what looks like the vaults of the U.S. Treasury depository at Fort Knox. The film’s producers asked to film inside the actual vaults, but the United States government would not let them. To solve the problem, the producers built their own fake vaults and filled them with fake gold. But the vaults and the gold looked so real that the producers had to hire 24-hour security to prevent thieves from breaking in and stealing it.

Aston Martin Was Not Interested

Golden Aston Martin

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The Aston Martin car that James Bond drives is recognized as an iconic image in movie history. But the Aston Martin Company did not want to give the producers one of their cars for free. The Aston Martin used in “Goldfinger” was actually purchased by the movie’s producers for the film. After the success of the movie and the boost in Aston Martin sales, the producers were able to get free cars for future films.

Gold is Not Magnetic

Non Magnetic Gold

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One of the scenes that fans remember from the movie is when James Bond puts a magnetic tracking device on Goldfinger’s car after the two finish playing a game of golf. Goldfinger’s car is made from 18-karat gold, which means that it is 75 percent gold. Anything made from 18-karat gold is not going to be magnetic.

Bond Diffuses the Bomb in Style

007 Bomb

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The producers of James Bond movies always like including quick scenes that some fans catch and some do not. When Bond diffuses the bomb at the end of the movie, the bomb’s countdown clock stops on 0:07 seconds.

Crushing a Continental

Golden Ford

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Fans who know the movie “Goldfinger” remember that a brand new Ford Lincoln Continental was crushed during the movie in a scrap yard scene. Ford actually supplied a free Lincoln Continental for this movie in exchange for having the new Mustang featured in a scene in the Swiss Alps. At that time, the Lincoln Continental was considered the height of luxury and style. While the scene of the Lincoln crushing was being filmed, the crew remained completely silent at the sight of a brand new Lincoln Continental being purposely destroyed.

Men Playing Women

Golden Men

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The guys who have seen “Goldfinger” remember the female Flying Circus that appeared to be made up of a whole troupe of scantily clad young ladies. The truth is that a significant portion of those ladies were actually men in drag.

There is a magic to movies that some people find alluring. But it is always fun to learn interesting facts about our favorite films, especially when the facts are about James Bond’s “Goldfinger”.

The Most Spectacular Gold Heists of All Time

A lot of robbers have made detailed plans to heist gold. Most of those plans fall through or result in small hauls. Others go down in the history books as some of the most spectacular gold heists of all time.

The Brink’s-MAT Heist at London Heathrow Airport

Heathrow Gold Heist

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Date: November 26, 1983

Location: London, England

Value: $33 million

Brink’s-MAT, a security company based in Virginia, didn’t do its job very well at its London Heathrow Airport location on November 26, 1983. In what was an obvious inside job, a gang of six men entered the warehouse with the help of a security job. Originally planning to steal about $4 million in cash, they ended up pouring gasoline on security guards and threatening to set them on fire if they didn’t open a vault containing $33 million of gold, diamonds, and cash.

Police suspect that as many as 15 people were involved in the heist, but only three were ever brought to justice.

The Great Ghan Gold Robbery

Ghan Gold Robbery

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Date: May 28-30, 1934

Location: Northern Territory, Australia

Value: $550,000

The Great Ghan Gold Robbery didn’t result in the world’s biggest haul, but it is one of the most mysterious heists. While traveling between Alice Springs and Quorn, Australia, someone took 34 pounds of gold from an unguarded safe aboard the Northern Express train. A guarded safe on the train wasn’t even touched. Either the robbers didn’t want any trouble, or it was an inside job.

Authorities never arrested anyone for the crime (they didn’t even know exactly when the crime had occurred). The train company fined one of the guards a small amount for his carelessness.

Weston Gold Robbery

Weston Gold Theft

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Date: June 30, 1861

Location:  Weston, West Virginia

Value: $500,000

West Virginia, the only state established during the Civil War, has a complicated past that not only includes battles between the North and South, but a gold heist that helped fund the Union’s administration. In 1861, Colonel Erastus Tyler, accompanied by the 7th Ohio Volunteer Infantry, roused the residents of Weston in search of secession sympathizers. They were also there to “collect” a large stash of gold intended to pay for the construction of a new railroad.

The Union soldiers left enough money to pay construction workers, but they made off with about $500,000 worth of gold. That money was then used to build a hospital and barracks that helped establish West Virginia as a Union state separate from the seceded Virginia.

Beirut Gold Heist

Beirut Gold Heist

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Date: January 1976

Location: Beirut, Lebanon

Value: Between $20 million and $50 million

Recognized by the Guinness Book of World Records as history’s biggest safe deposit box robbery, a group of guerilla soldiers stole a large amount of gold bars, cash, and jewelry from the British Bank of the Middle East. The soldiers stole from numerous safe deposit boxes, so it’s impossible to know exactly how much they took. Many estimate the value between $20 million and $50 million.

A truce later ended much of the fighting between Christian and Muslim forces in Beirut, but one lucky group of soldiers made off with a fortune. They were never officially held accountable for the theft.

Considering gold’s persistently high value, it’s no wonder that so many robbers want to steal it. What would you do if you suddenly had a stash of gold worth hundreds of thousands of dollars?

The Meanings Behind Gold Idioms

Have you ever heard someone say another has a heart of gold? Many things are said to be worth their weight in gold. Where did these idioms come from, and what exactly do they mean?

Gold Standard

Gold Standard

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Where it started: The gold standard was adopted by most countries in the mid-1800s. This standard stated that if someone wanted to trade in their paper money, it would be backed by the government for the same value in gold. What did this achieve? It helped the people to pay for goods and services without having to haul around tons of heavy metal. The value of the money was real, and everyone knew it.

What it means today: The majority of the countries who had originally adopted this standard let it go by the wayside around the time of World War 1. This helped them pay for the war, which wasn’t cheap. Today, however, the phrase “gold standard” is still heavily used. Today, it means the best of the best; it is the standard by which all others are held. If a product is the gold standard, there is nothing better. This term is used for any items with a wide variance of quality.

All That Glitters is Not Gold

Glittering Gold

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Where it started: Back in the days of the gold rush, there were many people panning for gold all over the world. However, many found pyrite instead of gold. Otherwise known as fool’s gold, this stone was practically worthless. It looked pretty, and even shined much more than authentic gold. Unfortunately, all that meant was that many fell for Mother Nature’s ruse.

What it means today: The phrase “all that glitters is not gold” is used as a cautionary statement. This phrase warns people who even though something looks great that does not mean it is. Things do not have value simply because they are pretty.

Worth its Weight in Gold

Weight in Gold

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Where it started: This saying has roots back to the Roman Empire. Gold has always been valuable, and because of that, the more you had, the wealthier you were. Of course, the more gold you had, the more it weighed, as well.

What it means today: The meaning hasn’t changed much in the intervening years. Today, the phrase “worth its weight in gold” still means that something is very valuable. However, many times the saying is given to things without a tangible value or weight. If someone says, for example, that their education is worth its weight in gold, they simply mean that they feel their schooling was extremely important and valuable to them.

Heart of Gold

Heart of Gold

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Where it started: Gold has symbolized many things to many cultures through history. Some of the most common things it has represented, however, are luxury and nobility. The positive qualities of the metal are what this phrase point toward.

What it means today: If someone is said to have a heart of gold, it means that they are a kind, caring, loving person that puts others ahead of themselves. This harkens back to the meanings originally placed on the metal—all positive attributes in human nature.

There are many idioms that express the value and importance of gold in human history. For many centuries we have been enamored of the metal, and as we continue to value it we continue to use idioms exemplifying gold regularly.