6 Facts You Didn’t Know About James Bond’s Goldfinger

The James Bond franchise of movies is one of the most popular franchises of all time. The 1964 release “Goldfinger” stands as one of the installments that Bond fans come back to again and again. This iconic movie has been combed over by movie fans for decades, but there are still plenty of things that the average movie-goer does not know about this very famous movie.

The Gold Looked Real

Real Gold

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In the movie, there is a scene that is filmed in what looks like the vaults of the U.S. Treasury depository at Fort Knox. The film’s producers asked to film inside the actual vaults, but the United States government would not let them. To solve the problem, the producers built their own fake vaults and filled them with fake gold. But the vaults and the gold looked so real that the producers had to hire 24-hour security to prevent thieves from breaking in and stealing it.

Aston Martin Was Not Interested

Golden Aston Martin

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The Aston Martin car that James Bond drives is recognized as an iconic image in movie history. But the Aston Martin Company did not want to give the producers one of their cars for free. The Aston Martin used in “Goldfinger” was actually purchased by the movie’s producers for the film. After the success of the movie and the boost in Aston Martin sales, the producers were able to get free cars for future films.

Gold is Not Magnetic

Non Magnetic Gold

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One of the scenes that fans remember from the movie is when James Bond puts a magnetic tracking device on Goldfinger’s car after the two finish playing a game of golf. Goldfinger’s car is made from 18-karat gold, which means that it is 75 percent gold. Anything made from 18-karat gold is not going to be magnetic.

Bond Diffuses the Bomb in Style

007 Bomb

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The producers of James Bond movies always like including quick scenes that some fans catch and some do not. When Bond diffuses the bomb at the end of the movie, the bomb’s countdown clock stops on 0:07 seconds.

Crushing a Continental

Golden Ford

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Fans who know the movie “Goldfinger” remember that a brand new Ford Lincoln Continental was crushed during the movie in a scrap yard scene. Ford actually supplied a free Lincoln Continental for this movie in exchange for having the new Mustang featured in a scene in the Swiss Alps. At that time, the Lincoln Continental was considered the height of luxury and style. While the scene of the Lincoln crushing was being filmed, the crew remained completely silent at the sight of a brand new Lincoln Continental being purposely destroyed.

Men Playing Women

Golden Men

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The guys who have seen “Goldfinger” remember the female Flying Circus that appeared to be made up of a whole troupe of scantily clad young ladies. The truth is that a significant portion of those ladies were actually men in drag.

There is a magic to movies that some people find alluring. But it is always fun to learn interesting facts about our favorite films, especially when the facts are about James Bond’s “Goldfinger”.

The Meanings Behind Gold Idioms

Have you ever heard someone say another has a heart of gold? Many things are said to be worth their weight in gold. Where did these idioms come from, and what exactly do they mean?

Gold Standard

Gold Standard

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Where it started: The gold standard was adopted by most countries in the mid-1800s. This standard stated that if someone wanted to trade in their paper money, it would be backed by the government for the same value in gold. What did this achieve? It helped the people to pay for goods and services without having to haul around tons of heavy metal. The value of the money was real, and everyone knew it.

What it means today: The majority of the countries who had originally adopted this standard let it go by the wayside around the time of World War 1. This helped them pay for the war, which wasn’t cheap. Today, however, the phrase “gold standard” is still heavily used. Today, it means the best of the best; it is the standard by which all others are held. If a product is the gold standard, there is nothing better. This term is used for any items with a wide variance of quality.

All That Glitters is Not Gold

Glittering Gold

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Where it started: Back in the days of the gold rush, there were many people panning for gold all over the world. However, many found pyrite instead of gold. Otherwise known as fool’s gold, this stone was practically worthless. It looked pretty, and even shined much more than authentic gold. Unfortunately, all that meant was that many fell for Mother Nature’s ruse.

What it means today: The phrase “all that glitters is not gold” is used as a cautionary statement. This phrase warns people who even though something looks great that does not mean it is. Things do not have value simply because they are pretty.

Worth its Weight in Gold

Weight in Gold

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Where it started: This saying has roots back to the Roman Empire. Gold has always been valuable, and because of that, the more you had, the wealthier you were. Of course, the more gold you had, the more it weighed, as well.

What it means today: The meaning hasn’t changed much in the intervening years. Today, the phrase “worth its weight in gold” still means that something is very valuable. However, many times the saying is given to things without a tangible value or weight. If someone says, for example, that their education is worth its weight in gold, they simply mean that they feel their schooling was extremely important and valuable to them.

Heart of Gold

Heart of Gold

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Where it started: Gold has symbolized many things to many cultures through history. Some of the most common things it has represented, however, are luxury and nobility. The positive qualities of the metal are what this phrase point toward.

What it means today: If someone is said to have a heart of gold, it means that they are a kind, caring, loving person that puts others ahead of themselves. This harkens back to the meanings originally placed on the metal—all positive attributes in human nature.

There are many idioms that express the value and importance of gold in human history. For many centuries we have been enamored of the metal, and as we continue to value it we continue to use idioms exemplifying gold regularly.

5 Reasons George Soros is Wrong to Sell Gold Now

If you follow gold, you have probably heard of George Soros. Not only is he a billionaire, Soros Fund Management is one of the biggest gold traders around. And you may have heard that in February, 2013 the crazy billionaire sold off over half his shares in the gold EFT, Kinross Gold Corp and Freeport-McMoran. There are many reasons that, as a gold investor, you should not do the same.

Reason #1: He’s Done it Before, and He’ll Do it Again

Soros Sells His Gold

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Maybe Soros is picky. Maybe he is nervous. Or maybe he just has a thing against gold. However, the 2013 purge of gold shares isn’t the first time the billionaire has played this trick. In 2011, he sold off about $800 million worth of gold, gold-related shares and investments.

Reason #2: Gold Prices Fluctuate

Gold Prices Fluctuate

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Let’s be honest, the price that Soros sold his stocks at is a dipping price. Since he sold, the price has started rising again. In fact, many predict that the price will continue to rise. There is a trick to buying and selling gold. You don’t want to sell at the lowest price. Don’t get scared just because you see a dip in the market.

Reason #3: There’s a Reason it’s Called the Gold Standard

The Gold Standard

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Gold has been around for a really long time. Much longer than our paper money, our stock market, or even our current society. So think about it. Do you really, truly think that gold is going anywhere? Not only has this precious metal been used for centuries as currency, it is also used in medical equipment, scientific experiments, artistic works, and more. Companies may come and go; stocks may rise and fall, but gold… well, gold is forever.

Reason #4: It’s Gaining a Global Market

Global Gold Market

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In the United States, there may be less demand for gold jewelry. However, this does not mean that there is less demand throughout the world for gold in general. Other countries are clamoring for jewelry-quality gold. On top of that, there is gold that is used in a variety of other products. Remember, gold is not a local market, it is a world-wide commodity.

Reason #5: Blindly Following Anyone in the Stock Market Game is a Bad Idea

Investment Choices

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Assuming you don’t have millions of dollars to throw around, you probably don’t have the kind of money to make a crappy decision on the stock market and come out unscathed. To be honest, blindly following anyone, even someone who is supposed to be a ‘guru’ in the stock market, is simply stupid. Instead, weigh your options, talk to your financial advisors, and make a well-informed decision. Soros sold his stock to make a quick buck. If you are looking to make a good profit from your gold investment, do so smartly, not by following Soros.

When you invest in gold, you are making a great long-term investment. It is important that you don’t get scared out of the market simply because someone with a prominent name decides they want to sell off some of their shares.

The Meaning of Gold Across Cultures

Since the dawn of humanity, gold and people have shared a relationship. Its beauty makes it desirable for jewelry and building materials. Its rarity makes it a valuable trade commodity. A large portion of human history depended on gold for the wealth of nations and citizens. How complicated is our relationship with the king of precious metals?

Gold in The Middle East

Middle Eastern Gold

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Most likely, someone found the first shiny example of gold in a body of water, but we can’t be sure. We do know gold refinement predates our use of iron and copper. Ancient Egyptians related the beauty and power of gold with the gods. Gold was called the Skin of the Gods.

The earliest examples of refined gold appear in the Middle East, where civilization began. The oldest examples we have were found in the tombs of Egypt’s Queen Zer and Ur’s Queen Pu-abi, indicating humans began crafting gold pieces as early as three millenniums B.C. The largest collection of gold was found in the tomb of Egypt’s King Tutankhamen.

As early as 700 B.C., artists in the Persian Empire (now Iran) used advanced gold refining processes. Much of this work centered around Zoroastrianism religious pieces. After the Arabs came to this region, stunningly beautiful animal art began to appear.

Gold in China

Gold in China

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While the Middle East enjoyed a wealth of gold, China was robbed early. Until the Han Dynasty, China was wealthy in gold, but since the fall of this great empire China has suffered from a lack of this resource. Theories on how China’s gold was lost vary. Some believe China never really had much gold, most of what was believed to be gold was actually copper. Others think the Hans buried China’s gold or took it somewhere else.

International trade required gold for centuries. China had to export large quantities of grain, even as citizens were starving, in exchange for goods they had to import. Another setback occurred when the Nationalist Government fell. Most of China’s gold ended up in Taiwan as the Nationalists fled the country. Even now, the ownership and exchange of gold by the Chinese people is highly regulated.

Gold In Europe

European Gold

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Europe’s fascination with gold began during the Roman Empire. As in the Middle East, gold was first used in jewelry. It then began showing up in household goods and even furniture in homes of the higher classes. Gradually, gold coins became currency. About 300 years B.C., Roman citizens were recognized by their necklaces, which bore coins emblazoned with the image of the emperor.

As Christianity swept Europe, people began burying gold with their dead. Because of this, very little of Europe’s golden items survived the Middle Ages. Gradually, Europe began using the gold standard of currency. Great Britain adopted it in 1821, followed by the rest of Europe in the 1870’s.

Gold In The Americas

American Gold

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Even before European settlers sailed to the Americas, Indians had developed advanced gold refining processes like filigree, granulation, inlay and other gold working methods. In fact, when Spanish settlers arrived, the Indians had already developed all of the gold working knowledge possessed by the Spanish.

By this time, the whole world recognized the value of gold in adornments and in currency. By the end of World War I, Europe and everyone except the U.S. had abandoned the gold standard. By the mid-20th Century, the U.S. dollar became the basis for international trade, replacing the longstanding use of gold. Today, gold is used mostly for jewelry, high-tech electronics and as an investment against economic collapse.

Is the Gold Bull Market Over?

Most experts speculate that the gold bull market will continue through 2013. Some, however, disagree with this perspective. Comparing their arguments should help you decide whether you think now is a great time to invest in gold.

Bear Market: Growth in the US Economy Means Falling Gold Prices

Gold Market

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Some market speculators believe that gold prices will fall as the US economy stabilizes. US economic growth will mean that more investors around the world want to buy USD instead of gold. This will drive up the value of US currency while causing the value of gold to fall slightly.

Bull Market Response: The World Economy Suggests Higher Gold Prices

Gold Bull Market

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Yes, the US economy will likely grow somewhat in 2013, but that growth will come at a slow pace that will not excite investors around the world. Unemployment remains high; the government cannot take control of its debt; and wages have not risen to match inflation. All of this spells bad news for USD.

It’s also important to note that the price of gold doesn’t rely on the US economy alone. Half of the world is stuck struggling through a recession. The rest is stuck in economic depression. When seen from a global perspective, investors simply cannot put as much faith in currency as they can in gold.

Bear Market: As Interest Rates Rise, Gold’s Value Will Fall

Gold Bear Market

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During the 1980s, the price of gold fell as interest rates began to climb. Assuming that the Fed will begin to raise interest rates as the US economy improves and needs less assistance, the price of gold will fall during 2013. As the value of gold begins to slip, investors will likely panic and sell it at lower rates. This will lead to a steady decline in value.

Bull Market Response: Gold Maintains Value in all Economic Conditions

Gold Maintains Value

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Yes, there is some chance that higher interest rates could mean that the value of gold falls somewhat. This, however, is based on pure speculation. There simply isn’t enough historical evidence to support such a conclusion. It’s also important to look at the data from the 1980s. While one can find a general correlation between rising interest rates and falling gold prices, the chart is inconsistent. In some years, interest rates and gold prices were equally high.

The fact of the matter is that gold maintains value in all economic conditions. Buying gold is always the safe bet. Even if the value were to fall slightly in 2013, it would eventually rise again. What’s important is for investors to recognize the difference between short-term profits and long-term stability. It seems most likely that gold’s value will increase next year. Even if it doesn’t, though, it still offers more long-term stability and growth than other investment options.

Now that you have seen both sides of the argument, do you think that the gold bull market is actually over, or are you ready to start putting your money in a precious metal that will give you short-term profits as well as long-term stability no matter where the economy heads?